Cars

How One Engineer Landed a Dream Job of Developing Cars for Bugatti

From Autoweek

Meet Sven Bohnhorst, the luckiest man in the world. Why, you ask? Because he gets paid to drive Bugattis around racetracks. Afterwards, he makes changes to the Bugatti and drives it again to see whether he likes it or not. Bohnhorst is a chassis setup engineer at Bugatti, and he does things like tune the steering on cars like the upcoming Chiron Pur Sport. The car that Bugatti limited sales to 60 at a price of 3,000,000 euros, which is about $3,400,000, is his development mule.

Intrigued and curious how Bohnhorst managed to get this position, we asked him how he got the job, what makes the Pur Sport stand out from the standard Chiron and much more.

Photo credit: Bugatti

Autoweek: How did you become an engineer at Bugatti?

Sven Bohnhorst: I started at Bugatti as a trainee, then continued as a working student and

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These 20 Cars Cost the Most To Maintain

If you’re in the market for a new car, keep in mind that sticker prices don’t include the cost of gas mileage — or maintenance. Sometimes a set of wheels with a modest price tag can be among the most expensive cars to own. That’s because as the years tick by, the slow drip of tune-ups, repairs and upkeep can drain a driver’s budget with the hidden but inevitable costs of ongoing maintenance.

GOBankingRates used data compiled by YourMechanic to determine which makes and models are the most expensive cars to maintain over the course of 10 years. Take a look at which vehicles could cost you more than expected.

Last updated: July 17, 2020

20. Mini Cooper

  • 10-year cost to maintain: $11,200

The Mini Cooper traces its history to 1957 and the Suez Canal crisis, which sent global fuel prices skyrocketing. The masses in post-World War II England

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The Greatest Cars of All Time: Choosing the One

From Car and Driver

Michael Jordan. The Beatles. Bill Murray. Some giants stand so far above the rest that their exceptionalism is a foregone conclusion. You can argue that someone else played the game better, but the societal consensus says you’re just being a contrarian.

No vehicle looms large enough to be the uncontested greatest, though. We know because, in the course of debating Car and Driver‘s list of legends, we hit gridlock when we tried to pick the one car that was greater than the other 41.

We named our GOATs based on their technological innovation, influence on the industry, simple beauty, and/or driver engagement. Any car that’s going to rise above the others needs to rank highly in all four of those categories. Its shape should be as graceful as the Lamborghini Miura’s, the Jaguar E-type’s, or the split-window Chevy Corvette’s. It should dissect a decreasing-radius

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The Greatest Cars of All Time: The Seventies

From Car and Driver

For July’s issue, we compiled a list of the most important cars ever built, and worked forward from 1955, when we were founded as Sports Car Illustrated, and the modern auto industry came of age. These are Car and Driver‘s GOATS – the Greatest of All Time. Today: The Seventies.

Photo credit: Charlie Magee – Car and Driver

1970 Range Rover

Shortly after its European debut in 1970, British Leyland’s Range Rover became a museum piece—the first vehicle to be displayed at the Louvre in Paris. It was featured there as an “exemplary work of industrial design,” which would prove to be a prophetic accolade considering its lasting influence. Rover had set out to match the success of the Jeep Wagoneer and Ford Bronco with a luxury bent. In doing so, the company cast the mold for a vehicle as good

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